New World Man (2010): Tribute

Combines the previous two Rush tribute releases, Working Man (1996) and Subdivisions (2005), from Magna Carta Records, plus adds three previously unreleased tracks.

Album Tracks:

1. New World Man

Robert Berry (Ambrosia)
Chris Pennie (Dillinger Escape Plan)
Dave Martone (Dream Theater)
Shane Gibson (Korn)
Juan Alderete (Mars Volta)

2. The Trees

Mike Baker (Shadow Gallery)
Brendt Allman (Shadow)
Chris Ingles (Shadow Gallery)
Gary Wehrkamp (Shadow Gallery)
Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater)
Billy Sheehan (Mr. Big)

3. Fly by Night

Sal Marrano
Robert Berry (Ambrosia)
Chris Pennie (Dillinger Escape Plan)
Dave Martone (Dream Theater)
Shane Gibson (Korn)
Juan Alderete (Pulse Ultra)

4. Mission

Robert Berry (Ambrosia)
Eric Martin (Mr. Big)
Brad Kaiser

5. Tom Sawyer

I, Omega

6. Jacob’s Ladder

Sebastian Bach (Skid Row)
John Petrucci (Dream Theater)
Matt Guillory (Dali’s Dilemma)
Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater)
Billy Sheehan (Mr. Big)
Brendt Allman (Shadow)

7. Limelight

Kip Winger (Winger)
Andreas Kisser (Sepultra)
Vinnie Moore (UFO)
Stu Hamm (Steve Vai)
Mike Mangini (Steve Vai)
Robert Berry (Ambrosia)
Jeff Feldman (Pulse Ultra)
Trent Gardner (Time Bandits)

8. Force Ten

Robert Berry (Ambrosia)
Chris Pennie (Dillinger Escape Plan)
Dave Martone (Dream Theater)
Shane Gibson (Korn)
Juan Alderete (Mars Volta)

9. Subdivision

Randy Jackson (Zebra)
Dominic Cifarelli (Pulse Ultra)
Jeff Feldman (Pulse Ultra)
Vinnie Moore (UFO)
Stu Hamm (Steve Vai)
Mike Mangini (Steve Vai)
Robert Berry (Ambrosia)
Trent Gardner (Time Bandits)

10. Tom Sawyer

Alex Skolnick Trio

Virtuosic Reinterpretations

Review (edited and excerpted) by Matt Shelvock on Prog Rock Music Talk:

New World Man effectively captures the spirit of its original material. Some of today’s most influential progressive artists worked on the album, adding a variety of textures and musical approaches. Many of the guitar solos, for example, reflect the respective styles of each player. It is not all about guitar solos for New World Man, however. Songs such as ‘Force Ten’ do a fantastic job of featuring each musician throughout a textural journey. This track in particular stands out for a few reasons. First and foremost, “Force Ten” is an effective reinterpretation rather than a carbon copy. It has been made edgier through enhanced dynamics, where dropped-tuned guitars and shredder-arpeggio sequences make the song heavier in order to contrast the more quiet parts. A couple of moments on the album fall short, however. There are times when the overall mix does not favour the album’s performers. ‘Tom Sawyer,’ for example, would benefit from more ambience or depth on some of the instruments (or vocals), and the guitars would benefit from a slight midrange boost and perhaps more power-tube involvement. The bass in this track sounds fantastic, but overpowers the kick drum which, as a result, is left sounding empty and attack-heavy. The classic tune “Limelight” makes up for the short comings of the former track, however, with a superb mix and the interjection of newly composed riffs mixed with old material.

Red the entire, unedited, review.

Rush songs with multiple tributes

Back to Tribute Albums

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~ by rvkeeper on April 26, 2011.

 
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