The Analog Kid: Background

“Almost a sequel to ‘Subdivisions,’ the analog kid, dreaming of success, represents Rush growing up in the days of analog.”—Robert Telleria, Merely Players

“I think every young musician can relate to this. You have this dream about making it but don’t really know what that means. You just go for this goal with your eyes closed, you heart wide open, and let things happen from there. I don’t think any of us realized how far Rush would go and I don’t think we like to think about it, either.” (Success Under Pressure)—Geddy in Merely Players

In the piece, “a boy’s suburban reverie of busy urban streets, autumn woods, and winter skies (visions interrupted as his mother’s voice calls him back to reality) dramatizes the desire to flee suburbs.”—Christopher McDonald, Rush, Rock Music, and the Middle Class

After the boy’s daydream is interrupted by his mother, he “pulls down his baseball cap over his eyes. Like the humanoid escapee in ‘The Body Electric’ [on Grace Under Pressure] he is experiencing overload, a clash of signals, a confusion of programming. Whose voice will he heed? That of the dryad [the beautiful maiden featured in his daydream] or his mother? Heartstrings or apron-strings? He will leave home; there’s really no question about that. But when? And what will he find?”—Carol Selby Price and Robert Price, Mystic Rhythms

“‘The Analog Kid’ was my first attempt at non-fiction. For the longest time I stepped into characters until I had my own confidence and technique to be able to step outside them as a writer.” (Canadian Musician)—Neil in Merely Players

“The fawn-eyed girl with the sun-browned legs,” about whom the narrator is daydreaming before his mother calls him home, is based on Neil’s first experience with puppy love. It was with a girl from Beach City, Ohio, that he met while attending the 1967 World’s Fair in Montreal when he was 15. For a year afterward they maintained their relationship through letters. “Her father was extremely watchful and we never even kissed. . . . When her letters trickled off, I was devastated. Maybe her father made her stop writing to me.”—Neil in Roadshow

In the production of the song, the guitar is given more emphasis than other songs on Signals, “but nowhere near the levels of earlier records. Still, there is some meticulous musical interplay between Alex and Geddy.”—Bill Banasiewicz, Rush Visions

“‘The Analog Kid’ and ‘Digital Man’ served as the inspiration for writer Troy Hickman to create the comic book heroes of the same name, Digital Man and Analog Kid, in the 2004 comic Common Grounds.”—Wikipedia

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~ by rvkeeper on January 11, 2011.

 
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